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Phoebe to Open Mass Vaccination Sites For Pfizer COVID-19 Boosters


Albany, GA | Sept. 28, 2021  –  Over the next week, Phoebe will open three mass vaccination sites in southwest Georgia to administer COVID-19 booster shots to those who are eligible to receive a third shot based on guidelines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH). Currently, only the Pfizer vaccine is approved for a third dose. Those who are eligible must have received their second dose at least six months ago.

“Research shows the level of immunity may wane in some individuals six to eight months after they become fully vaccinated. We certainly want to do all we can to offer the best protection to our community, so we will commit significant resources to provide boosters to as many people as possible in the coming weeks, following guidance from the state and federal governments,” said Dianna Grant, MD, Phoebe Putney Health System Chief Medical Officer.

Phoebe will operate mass booster sites in Albany, Americus and Sylvester in the same locations where it provided initial COVID-19 vaccinations in those communities. The locations and hours of operation are as follows:

Albany – Phoebe Healthworks, 311 W. 3rd Ave.

  • Thursday, Sept. 30 – Friday, Oct 1 | 9 am – 5 pm
  • Saturday, Oct. 2 & 9 | 9 am – 1 pm
  • Tuesdays – Fridays, Oct. 5 – 15 | 9 am – 5 pm

Americus – Sumter County EMA (the former National Guard Armory), 901 Adderton St.

  • Tuesdays – Thursdays beginning on Tuesday, Oct. 5 | 9 am – 12 pm

Sylvester – Phoebe Worth Medical Center, 807 S. Isabella St.

  • Mondays – Thursdays beginning on Wednesday, Sept. 29 | 9 am – 11 am, 1 pm – 4:30 pm

“While we are focusing on booster shots, we will also provide first and second doses at our mass sites for those who are not fully vaccinated. We will re-evaluate the demand in a few weeks and determine if we need to keep these large sites open, or if we can handle the demand at our clinics and mobile wellness clinic events,” said Phoebe Vice President of Operations Will Peterson, who is overseeing Phoebe’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts.

Southwest Georgians can schedule appointments at the mass vaccination sites – and other Phoebe locations – by calling 229-312-MYMD or by going to www.phoebehealth.com/coronavirus or using the Phoebe Access mobile app.

The recommendations for COVID-19 vaccine booster shots from DPH are:

  • People 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a Pfizer booster at least six months after receiving their second Pfizer shot.
  • People aged 50-64 with underlying medical conditions should receiver a Pfizer booster at least six months after receiving their second Pfizer shot.
  • People aged 18-49 may receive a Pfizer booster at least six months after their second Pfizer shot, based on their individual benefits and risks.
  • People aged 18-64 who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may receive a Pfizer booster at least six months after their second Pfizer shot, based on their individual benefits and risks.

Those receiving a booster shot, must bring their vaccination card to their appointment. Anyone who has lost their vaccination card can request a new card from Phoebe Medical Records 229-312-6000, if they received their vaccinations in Georgia. If they were vaccinated in another state, they must contact the location where the vaccinations were administered to request a new card.

“While only those who received the Pfizer vaccine are currently eligible for booster shots, it is likely the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will be approved for boosters later this year. We encourage people to consider boosters when they are eligible and to reach out to their physicians with any questions or concerns,” Dr. Grant said. “We hope anyone who has been putting off getting a first dose will reconsider and get the shot to protect themselves and those around them.”