News & Announcements

Phoebe Recognized Again for Excellence in Stroke Care


Albany, Ga. – For the fifth year, Phoebe received the Get With The Guidelines® Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for their commitment to providing quality stroke care and treatment to patients who suffer cardiac arrests. “This is a true testament of our dedication to ensure stroke patients receive the highest quality of care,” said Dr. Marla Morgan, Phoebe Neurology.

Phoebe earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health, get a follow-up visit scheduled, as well as other care transition interventions.

Additionally, Phoebe received the Association’s Target: StrokeSM Honor Roll Elite award for the third year. To qualify for this recognition, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke.

“Every second counts when it comes to stroke care. Not only is our immediate stroke team dedicated to stroke care but employees throughout the hospital are continually educated on the most current stroke awareness guidelines,” added Dr. Morgan.

Get With The Guidelines® is the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s hospital-based quality improvement program that provides hospitals with the latest research-based guidelines. Developed with the goal of saving lives and hastening recovery, Get with the Guidelines has touched the lives of more than 6 million patients since 2001.